Also Check Out
ATVFlorida.com
PinballShark.com

© 2014
HondaCB1.org Message Forums
July 21, 2017, 10:38:22 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Welcome to HondaCB1.org! Please register in the Forum to post messages or view attached photos.
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: 1 2 3 [4]
  Print  
Author Topic: Talk to me about the blackbird shock  (Read 2064 times)
VintageHunter
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Location: Southern California-LA-Valencia

Posts: 1210


View Profile
« Reply #45 on: June 28, 2017, 01:55:06 AM »

I know these aren't the BB shock but...they are 900rr shocks which would provide an alternate to the BB shock:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/1998-HONDA-CBR-900RR-900-RR-REAR-SHOCK-W-LINKAGE-item-1187-/182570105302?hash=item2a8206b9d6:g:-KkAAOSw-K9ZFJWF&vxp=mtr

http://www.ebay.com/itm/1993-1995-Honda-Cbr900rr-Rear-Back-Shock-Absorber-Suspension-/322557222484?hash=item4b19e89e54:g:q24AAOSwyWZZRD3a&vxp=mtr

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Honda-CBR-900-900RR-919-RR-CBR900-CBR900RR-Rear-Shock-Spring-suspension-93-99-/232381470510?fits=Make%3AHonda&hash=item361b03d72e:g:muQAAOSwjk9ZSpI8&vxp=mtr




"Oops"

I BINed on a blackbird shock. £25 posted and not rusted to destruction. Should fix the loose hagon top bush, and allow me to fit new swingarm adapters without losing ride height so i can keep the longer stand. Win win win... hopefully.

How do people keep finding £25 shocks? The cheapest I've seen us £75!

But the BB spring is sadly too light for me. Or do I need to fit the CB-1 shock with a spacer? I'm actually confused now. I think I need to download and re-read Jim's full post agsinst.
Logged

a_morti
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Location: Gibraltar

Posts: 1917



View Profile
« Reply #46 on: June 28, 2017, 03:15:06 AM »

"Oops"

I BINed on a blackbird shock. £25 posted and not rusted to destruction. Should fix the loose hagon top bush, and allow me to fit new swingarm adapters without losing ride height so i can keep the longer stand. Win win win... hopefully.

How do people keep finding £25 shocks? The cheapest I've seen us £75!

But the BB spring is sadly too light for me. Or do I need to fit the CB-1 shock with a spacer? I'm actually confused now. I think I need to download and re-read Jim's full post agsinst.
From what I've gathered here: if you're light (say 70kg / 155lb or less), a blackbird shock is an acceptable solution. If you're heavier you'll need to swap the spring, so you may as well get the cbr900 shock since it's better quality and has more adjustability on the damping.
Logged

Cam Drive Gear Train Smiley
VintageHunter
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Location: Southern California-LA-Valencia

Posts: 1210


View Profile
« Reply #47 on: June 28, 2017, 09:24:46 AM »

Aaron:
Short and to the point. Perfect response.
Logged

Sugs
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Location: San Diego, CA

Posts: 138



View Profile
« Reply #48 on: June 28, 2017, 11:06:15 AM »

But the BB spring is sadly too light for me. Or do I need to fit the CB-1 shock with a spacer? I'm actually confused now. I think I need to download and re-read Jim's full post agsinst.

Spacer is only required if you still want the softer initial spring rate of the CB-1 stock spring.  CB-1 spring is approximately 5/8 inch longer than the CBR900 spring, so when it is mounted on the CBR900 shock as is, the softer rate is compressed and you are left with the secondary stiffer rate portion of the spring.  Not necessarily a bad thing, especially for a heavier rider.
Logged

1979 Honda GL1000 Goldwing - 1990 Honda CB1
spacetiger
Full Member
***
Online Online

Posts: 125


View Profile
« Reply #49 on: June 28, 2017, 09:03:45 PM »

But the BB spring is sadly too light for me. Or do I need to fit the CB-1 shock with a spacer? I'm actually confused now. I think I need to download and re-read Jim's full post agsinst.

Spacer is only required if you still want the softer initial spring rate of the CB-1 stock spring.  CB-1 spring is approximately 5/8 inch longer than the CBR900 spring, so when it is mounted on the CBR900 shock as is, the softer rate is compressed and you are left with the secondary stiffer rate portion of the spring.  Not necessarily a bad thing, especially for a heavier rider.

This is correct; a cheap way of getting a stiffer spring on the shock.  But, be advised, the spring will loose some rate because you are riding on only a few coils.  A better solution would be to get a proper spring in there.  I'll look at this to see what options you will be faced with if you go in this direction since I have this shock already.

Jerry
Logged
Dash
Jr. Member
**
Online Online

Posts: 78


View Profile
« Reply #50 on: June 30, 2017, 09:18:06 AM »

"Oops"

I BINed on a blackbird shock. £25 posted and not rusted to destruction. Should fix the loose hagon top bush, and allow me to fit new swingarm adapters without losing ride height so i can keep the longer stand. Win win win... hopefully.

How do people keep finding £25 shocks? The cheapest I've seen us £75!

But the BB spring is sadly too light for me. Or do I need to fit the CB-1 shock with a spacer? I'm actually confused now. I think I need to download and re-read Jim's full post agsinst.
From what I've gathered here: if you're light (say 70kg / 155lb or less), a blackbird shock is an acceptable solution. If you're heavier you'll need to swap the spring, so you may as well get the cbr900 shock since it's better quality and has more adjustability on the damping.

Word.

Just put the CB-1 wth Blackbird shock through its paces at Brno. Holy sheet.  Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked

One of the best kept CB-1 secrets Id say.

Im 70 KG and the rear was planted like a tree. And I wasn t being subtle around the corners. The thing was amazing. Not once did the bike wobble, bounce or flinch.

Im sure faster riders than me, who know their way around the mysteries of suspension ( I still deem it all black magic) can give a better writeup. But to summarize:

If you re light like me, the BB shock offers a direct bolt on solution with very, very decent handling characteristics. Far better than the standard shock. Im sure other shocks are even more suited for the job.

But as far as cheap, easy replacements go for non-fatties in search of a new rear shock: The Blackbird shock is where it's at.  Wink
Logged
a_morti
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Location: Gibraltar

Posts: 1917



View Profile
« Reply #51 on: June 30, 2017, 10:09:03 AM »

Awesome write up and makes me feel good about having bought a BB shock myself.

Thank you!
Logged

Cam Drive Gear Train Smiley
spacetiger
Full Member
***
Online Online

Posts: 125


View Profile
« Reply #52 on: June 30, 2017, 06:08:41 PM »

"Oops"

I BINed on a blackbird shock. £25 posted and not rusted to destruction. Should fix the loose hagon top bush, and allow me to fit new swingarm adapters without losing ride height so i can keep the longer stand. Win win win... hopefully.

How do people keep finding £25 shocks? The cheapest I've seen us £75!

But the BB spring is sadly too light for me. Or do I need to fit the CB-1 shock with a spacer? I'm actually confused now. I think I need to download and re-read Jim's full post agsinst.
From what I've gathered here: if you're light (say 70kg / 155lb or less), a blackbird shock is an acceptable solution. If you're heavier you'll need to swap the spring, so you may as well get the cbr900 shock since it's better quality and has more adjustability on the damping.

Word.

Just put the CB-1 wth Blackbird shock through its paces at Brno. Holy sheet.  Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked

One of the best kept CB-1 secrets Id say.

Im 70 KG and the rear was planted like a tree. And I wasn t being subtle around the corners. The thing was amazing. Not once did the bike wobble, bounce or flinch.

Im sure faster riders than me, who know their way around the mysteries of suspension ( I still deem it all black magic) can give a better writeup. But to summarize:

If you re light like me, the BB shock offers a direct bolt on solution with very, very decent handling characteristics. Far better than the standard shock. Im sure other shocks are even more suited for the job.

But as far as cheap, easy replacements go for non-fatties in search of a new rear shock: The Blackbird shock is where it's at.  Wink

Dash,

What rebound damping setting do you have it on?
Logged
Dash
Jr. Member
**
Online Online

Posts: 78


View Profile
« Reply #53 on: July 01, 2017, 06:47:40 AM »

"Oops"

I BINed on a blackbird shock. £25 posted and not rusted to destruction. Should fix the loose hagon top bush, and allow me to fit new swingarm adapters without losing ride height so i can keep the longer stand. Win win win... hopefully.

How do people keep finding £25 shocks? The cheapest I've seen us £75!

But the BB spring is sadly too light for me. Or do I need to fit the CB-1 shock with a spacer? I'm actually confused now. I think I need to download and re-read Jim's full post agsinst.
From what I've gathered here: if you're light (say 70kg / 155lb or less), a blackbird shock is an acceptable solution. If you're heavier you'll need to swap the spring, so you may as well get the cbr900 shock since it's better quality and has more adjustability on the damping.

Word.

Just put the CB-1 wth Blackbird shock through its paces at Brno. Holy sheet.  Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked

One of the best kept CB-1 secrets Id say.

Im 70 KG and the rear was planted like a tree. And I wasn t being subtle around the corners. The thing was amazing. Not once did the bike wobble, bounce or flinch.

Im sure faster riders than me, who know their way around the mysteries of suspension ( I still deem it all black magic) can give a better writeup. But to summarize:

If you re light like me, the BB shock offers a direct bolt on solution with very, very decent handling characteristics. Far better than the standard shock. Im sure other shocks are even more suited for the job.

But as far as cheap, easy replacements go for non-fatties in search of a new rear shock: The Blackbird shock is where it's at.  Wink

Dash,

What rebound damping setting do you have it on?

Ive no idea. I didnt mess with it out of fear for screwing it up.

Any way I can tell? Then I can report back to you.
Logged
spacetiger
Full Member
***
Online Online

Posts: 125


View Profile
« Reply #54 on: July 01, 2017, 10:21:42 AM »

Dash,

You can't screw it up, you just adjust it to your liking; how you ride. 

On the lower shock mounting point, there is a screw on the side.  It will have markings if you turn the screw clockwise it is marked "H" (Hard) and it you turn the screw counterclockwise it is marked "S" (Soft).  Get a piece of paper and write down how many turns it takes from the current position all the way clockwise.  Then, count the number of turns to go all the way counterclockwise, write that down.  Now you know the full range and where you were when you had a good track day.   

Now, read this over on how to make the initial set up.  I copied from a web site, seems simple enough to follow:

Good Rebound Baseline

As a baseline for rebound it is often advised that it should take either the forks or shock about one second to extend back out to their original position.

To find that base setting, the easiest way is to adopt the Ďhalf wayí approach.

Start with the adjustment right in the middle of the full range. Test the rebound time using the above methods.

If it takes much longer than one second (too stiff i.e. too much rebound damping) then go half way between your current setting and fully-soft (three quarters out from fully-stiff).

If itís much shorter than one second, go half way between the current setting and fully-stiff (one quarter out from fully-stiff).

This method may take the longest, but it means you arenít guessing and can feel the rebound coming into the right setting as you go.

Itís worth noting that the changes to rebound damping are not necessarily linear, due to the needle and seat design we looked at in the last part.

This means that a one click change away from fully-stiff may not have as big an effect as a one click change away from fully-soft.

For this reason it isnít uncommon to have a lot of rebound damping applied (only a few clicks away from fully-stiff) because thatís all thatís required to alleviate enough of the damping to get a good setting.

Once youíve found a setting that creates this one second rebound, write it down as your base settings.

Go through the process again for the other end of the bike and right down the base setting once again.

If youíve never made adjustments before, compare your setting to what was applied before you made the change. If there is a sizeable difference in setting, you will notice a sizeable difference on the bike.


Dash, you can always go back to your initial setting, but experiment some.  It will not hurt you and is completely recoverable if you did the initial 2 steps first.  Also, google how to set up your damping, there is tons of good advise out there.

Let us know what you find.
Logged
Pages: 1 2 3 [4]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!