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Author Topic: Getting to 380 lbs.  (Read 1737 times)
spacetiger
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« on: March 07, 2017, 07:30:37 PM »

spec weight is 414 lbs wet. 

keeping the bike as a street legal bike, I'd like to get it down to 365 lbs but may only get to 380.  At 365, I'd have to shed 49 lbs - no easy task.  Trying to get to 10 lbs/HP

So, I'd like to hear from anyone who has taken the bike on a diet.  What changes did you make and how light did you get the bike.

Jerry
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VintageHunter
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« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2017, 08:15:41 PM »

Here ya go Spacetiger.
Enjoy looking thru this site.
This dude is "the Man".

I don't know if he's even around anymore or if he even still has the CB1 but...when he did.......wow!..look out.

http://home.planet.nl/~boerl060/cb1-rE.htm

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spacetiger
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« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2017, 09:27:29 PM »

That looks as minimal as you might get without going to light weight wheel$.  It doesn't look to be a street legal bike though.

Clearly, one has to change out the tail to drop weight. 

I may have to settle to just get to 400, so I'll leave 2 gallons of fuel out of the tank all the time.... Grin

What does your bike weigh VintageHunter?
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VintageHunter
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« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2017, 09:36:46 PM »

Mine is boner stock dude.
I'm in the same boat as you..."I'm" the one that has to lose the 40lbs....

Prob weighs in at close to the spec weight.
It'd be interesting to ride a CB1 that weighs in at 380 lbs.
sure would feel very different I can assure you.

When I win the lotto that will be one of my experiment project bikes.
To not worry about the how much on co$ts for the CB1 and to simply get it tricked out with the all the lightweight tidbits.
But until then, I'll continue to enjoy her as she is.

Mine mechanically is rock solid. It's been dialed in. She just needs a little love in the cosmetic depo.
Soon enough, it'll happen.

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a_morti
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« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2017, 03:31:46 AM »

You have to look for free things then look for cost effective things. Of course you'll save a lot by having a new frame made in ALU but that's not going to be codt effective.

Remove unnecessary stuff such as the luggage hooks at the rear.

Exhaust is heavy as the tubing is all double skin and the can itself is surprisingly heavy.

The wheels are stupid heavy. There were several pounds each to be saved by using the cbr400 6-spokes and those are certainly not light by modern standards. Lighter wheels have other handling benefits too.

Stick coils are cheap nowadays and will save a bit of weight plus give a better spark.

I hate alloy rear sprockets for durability reasons but it's usually 2lb or so to save.

Lithium battery, getting cheaper and a good 4lb to save.

Fit some smaller universal turn signals. Haven't measured on the CB but on my grom the originals were 0.6kg for the set and aftermarket weigh virtually nothing. You could remove the rear bracket then, and remount the fronts within the headlight triangles and chop those brackets.

The clocks are very heavy. Easy few pounds to save if you can fit a Koso type digital set. The surprisingly heavy engine cover which holds the speedo sensor could then be replaced for a plastic one from a cbr400.

Rear brake disc is heavy. Smaller and less ornate cbr900 disc fits the wheel. Sure you could find a caliper carrier off another Honda to make that work.

Anyway I guess what I'm saying is 400lb is easy, just change batter, wheels and exhaust. After that's it going to cost progressively more per pound. For example 'get an alloy bottom triple's isn't on my list as the cost isn't relative to the weight saved imho. You may want to look at alloy race clip ons though, not sure it's worth the white finger.

Also, will you really notice unless you're riding it on track? Probably not.
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spacetiger
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« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2017, 06:39:49 AM »

a_morti,

You hit almost all on my list.  The most significant one missing was a tail change but that could be tucked under the having a new frame made.

I will have to weigh the wheels when I get the bike.  I have seen the wheels are heavy comment several times. I am guessing they are like the Hawk GT wheels, also heavy.  Getting lighter weight exchangeable items from other bikes is harder in the US because smaller bikes were not imported.  I suppose my budget will be the final authority on what gets done.

Will I notice the weight change,  probably only in low speed situations.  Like all Hondas I have ridden, once under way, the bike does not feel heavy.
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a_morti
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« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2017, 07:34:57 AM »

A 600f3 (vfr750 is same) front rim fits. Drill disc holes to m8 or shim 8mm holes in disc to 6mm or find a shoulder bolt... And it's done. Believe there's a similar fix for the rear with an f2 wheel but idk details.
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a_morti
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« Reply #7 on: March 08, 2017, 07:41:05 AM »

If you can find a plastic sprocket cover from an nc29, a 600f1 sprocket cover will also probably fit, and looks to have much less metal on it and no speedo sensor.
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spacetiger
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« Reply #8 on: March 08, 2017, 05:36:13 PM »

I was thinking of a CB400SF front wheel.  It is a close enough match to the rear and satisfies my OCD need for dual discs up front.  I know it doesn't help me shed weight, but it shouldn't add too much weight when you make all the changes.  The tail will be one area to loose some weight I will explore.  The only problem with going down that path is it nets a near permanent change to the frame; it will be difficult to go back.

With a max $1,500 target budget for all mods, and a desire to make sure the suspension and brakes are sorted out, the total mod list will likely be short.  A front wheel and likely tire change all the way around might cap me. 

Thanks for ideas.  Seems there are only 3 active members at time...

Jerry
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a_morti
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« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2017, 05:56:45 PM »

Nc23 is supposed to be lighter than nc29, probably going to be lighter than 400sf too. Vtr1000f front wheel goes cheap enough, and the above will all fit the same discs and forks.

Spokes aren't quite a match on vtr but it's not far off and looks somehow lighter.
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spacetiger
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« Reply #10 on: March 08, 2017, 08:24:10 PM »

Yes, but the wallet dictated the use of the CB400SF front wheel - it gave me dual discs up front and contained the change to just the front wheel.  NC23 or NC29 would require a front and rear change.

But I am mounting the VTR1100 wheel on the Hawk GT to support the use of a 120/70-17 front tire. 
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VintageHunter
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« Reply #11 on: March 08, 2017, 08:43:00 PM »

did you ever post pictures of your CB-1?
I'm not sure I ever saw it?
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spacetiger
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« Reply #12 on: March 08, 2017, 08:45:37 PM »

Have not picked it up yet, 2 weeks away.

here is a lightweight one:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qxa2CTmeGh4
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VintageHunter
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« Reply #13 on: March 08, 2017, 08:49:54 PM »

that "lightweight one"....that's not you is it?
Have not picked it up yet, 2 weeks away.

here is a lightweight one:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qxa2CTmeGh4
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VintageHunter
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« Reply #14 on: March 08, 2017, 08:52:56 PM »

I had seen that one last year.
that tail section is interesting.
I think his lines are off though.
the tail shouldn't POP UP like that higher that the tank.
dunno if it's a German or European thing but I've seen these rat-retro-cafe-ish franken-bikes being created where they take the tail and JACK IT THE F UP so high it looks like a van rear ended the bike. LOOKS God aweful when they do that...........ugh...some folk just don't have any style I such-pose.
Have not picked it up yet, 2 weeks away.

here is a lightweight one:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qxa2CTmeGh4
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