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Author Topic: Getting to 380 lbs.  (Read 2030 times)
Dash
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« Reply #30 on: July 13, 2017, 07:35:46 AM »

wish there was more info on that particular CB1. Wondering where it is now? who rides it? is it only being used for track or street or both?
CB-1R  he calls it.  I could never tell what it weighs now, but below 400 for sure. 

The only thing I might have done differently, was set up the bike for best rake/trail before fabricating the tail so the orientation of the seat was best.  Looks great, but not sure what he did to the suspension.  Perhaps a Ohlins in the rear but no mod to the front; GVE maybe? 

Does anyone know what swing arm he used?

I love the mesh in the top front covering.

Jerry
Still looking for time to work on the CB-1...

Its a Dutch CB-1. It is a trackbike from what I can tell from the site.

Cutting the subframe and fitting a caferacer light-as-balls seat is still something Im quietly contemplating...
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a_morti
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« Reply #31 on: July 13, 2017, 10:33:41 AM »

I'm not sure there's all that much weight to be saved there? It's not one of the first places I'd look, anyways. Start from the wheels, they really are heavy. Even period correct cbr4/6 wheels are much lighter, you could surely take even more weight off with later model wheels such as rs250 or duke 390, just got to find something which can be adapted.

2006+ aprilia rs125 wheels look the nuts, are the right rim widths more or less (120/150-17) and take a single disc. Rear wheel would need flipped but i think that's ok. They also look brilliant. That would be my tip, i think.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2017, 10:38:52 AM by a_morti » Logged

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VintageHunter
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« Reply #32 on: July 13, 2017, 11:36:16 AM »

So...with regards to "weight reduction" for these elder 80's bikes.
Also, the rotating mass effect the rims would have.

But, again I'm not the sharpest tool in the box, but....with regards to the rim weight.
Would location of items being intended on making lighter matter? What I mean by that is....should the weight be concentrated say on mass that is higher up in a vertical distance from the ground or weight reduction is weight reduction no matter "where" it's located on the CB1?

Say the "tank" full of fuel. Obviously the "liquid" in the tank cant be reduced in weight but...if you notice, when you ride the CB1 or any bike for that matter, as soon as you are low on fuel, the bike feels much much more nimbler. So I'm wondering if a CF tank would reduce the weight by a big factor and the weight is indeed up higher?

Wondering if the combination of the rims (rotating mass) and weight down low "AND" the tank weight could make this little screamer feel even lighter still?
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a_morti
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« Reply #33 on: July 13, 2017, 03:13:42 PM »

VH, general weight reduction is great for acceleration as you're using less power to get yourself moving. Same goes for weight loss. Lighter rotational mass is supposed to be good for handling. You're thinking (i think) of mass centralisation,  which is meant to have various other benefits, although not much really came of it, even honda has stopped putting silencers under the seat now.

Still for me the point is that however you cut it, the wheels are really quite heavy and relatively easy to swap. Carbon tanks exist but have never really been in the realms of most bikers pockets, not to mention a rep for leaking as they age.

If I were looking for a simple-ish and fairly cheap way to improve the bike I'd get a pair of rs125 wheels, measure up for wheel spacers to centre the tyres and have them done in aluminium (ideal if you have your own lathe). Then the front 320mm disc is bigger and will need some work, so why not get a 4 pot caliper and make a bracket for it to fit. Now you have lighter wheels which take a common size radial tyre, and better brakes.

You'll still need to sort the chain line and figure out the rear disc but should be in realms of possibility with a few spacers etc.

Cbr600f2/3 has a 220mm rear disc same as the rs125 and cbr6 uses the same caliper as cb-1. That's a start.

Makes me want to have a go at the conversion.

Who wouldn't want these rims?
« Last Edit: July 13, 2017, 03:30:42 PM by a_morti » Logged

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ModerateFkr
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« Reply #34 on: July 13, 2017, 04:13:32 PM »

UK Honda Hawk 600 wheels look identical to CB-1 wheels, but the three spokes are hollow!

I met the owner of one at my local tool dealer the other day. If he leaves it lying around I might have to steal his wheels Wink
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a_morti
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« Reply #35 on: July 13, 2017, 04:31:42 PM »

Those rs wheels are prettier though!

Been scheming how it would go. Front and rear wheels use 20mm spindles, same as cb on front so that's easy. Cb rear is 17mm so just needs captive spacers made to fit, no problem. Cbr6 rear caliper carrier matches 220mm disc. Custom front caliper mount is the big part, but not insurmountable. Rear wheel needs flipping but loads of supermoto guys use these wheels flipped and ride offroad so they're plenty strong.

Hmm. Almost a shame my bike already has nice looking 6 spoke wheels.
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VintageHunter
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« Reply #36 on: July 13, 2017, 04:36:57 PM »

Me smells a sale item being uploaded to the "For Sale" forum pretty soon Wink
..........

Hmm. Almost a shame my bike already has nice looking 6 spoke wheels.
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« Reply #37 on: July 13, 2017, 04:56:42 PM »

Too much trouble for me since the rs is single front disc. But I'd love to see it done.

Seems the gs500e has a 310mm disc with a 64mm centre hole to match the cb disc diameter and the rs centre hole diameter. Could try opening the cb disc circle from 58 to 64 but not going to be an easy job for ny machinist setting that up, and clamping it. Easier to drill 6 holes i reckon.

Probably never happen but it's a fun thought experiment for a quiet evening.
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ModerateFkr
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« Reply #38 on: July 13, 2017, 05:56:06 PM »

Too much trouble for me since the rs is single front disc. But I'd love to see it done.

Seems the gs500e has a 310mm disc with a 64mm centre hole to match the cb disc diameter and the rs centre hole diameter. Could try opening the cb disc circle from 58 to 64 but not going to be an easy job for ny machinist setting that up, and clamping it. Easier to drill 6 holes i reckon.

Probably never happen but it's a fun thought experiment for a quiet evening.

a_morti

What type of machinery has your guy got?

If he's got a lathe with big enough swing, and a hollow centred faceplate, all he needs to do is fit a mild steel mandrel blank and turn it down to 58mm, mount the disk outside to the faceplate, then clamp it around the circumpheremce, remove the mandrel and bore it out to 64mm.

He could use a faceplate and an oversize tailstock centre if the bed is in good condition, and verify concentricity with a DTI.

Or he could CNC it on a miller.

Jobs that appear difficult often are not. Reverse engineering has been done for centuries. How was the first centre lathe, the first flat table, or the first steel/iron screw thread made?

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ptlcb1
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« Reply #39 on: July 13, 2017, 10:43:24 PM »

Now here is a fun thought...  A guy came dream, right?   Wink

www.blackstonetek.com
« Last Edit: July 13, 2017, 10:48:43 PM by ptlcb1 » Logged
Sugs
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« Reply #40 on: July 14, 2017, 01:46:51 AM »

Those RS wheels are pretty, and the CBR500 wheels look a lot like them.  I wonder if they would be a better fit.

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« Reply #41 on: July 14, 2017, 04:07:19 AM »

Those do kinda look similar. However the rs wheels are (i think) from OZ which makes them cooler and probably lighter, they are also from a 125 of a few years ago which has a tendency to die of engine failure which means they're cheap - eBay UK shows pairs of whees with tyres and discs around 150!

The honda wheels use a 320mm fixed disc which may be harder to match but not impossible.

Either set of wheels look much nicer than 80s 3 spokers.
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« Reply #42 on: July 14, 2017, 10:34:26 AM »

May be cheap for you guys across the pond, but here in the states they are very rare.  The tiny bikes are just not popular here.  Brief search on Ebay shows dozens of CBR500 wheels are out there, just not terribly cheap just yet.
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1979 Honda GL1000 Goldwing - 1990 Honda CB1
a_morti
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« Reply #43 on: July 14, 2017, 01:11:47 PM »

May be cheap for you guys across the pond, but here in the states they are very rare.  The tiny bikes are just not popular here.  Brief search on Ebay shows dozens of CBR500 wheels are out there, just not terribly cheap just yet.
Any better luck with nc700 wheels?
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« Reply #44 on: July 14, 2017, 07:57:09 PM »

Any better luck with nc700 wheels?

Nope, strike out there too.  Tons of cheap CBR250 wheels though, just looked.  Not sure of the size difference or if they would be strong enough.
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1979 Honda GL1000 Goldwing - 1990 Honda CB1
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