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Author Topic: Latest issue of Practical Sports Bikes  (Read 793 times)
ModerateFkr
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« Reply #15 on: August 18, 2017, 11:02:20 AM »

Funny this discussion popped up. When I was at Zandvoort, a man approached me (among some others) and started chatting away about the CB-1 (Its a shame the CB-1 is apperantly a scruffy biker magnet, rather than a chick magnet Grin ).

He told me to hang on to the CB, even if I were to get a new bike. He thought the CB-1 would become some sort of valuable collecter's item. He may be right. On  the other hand, it's also very possible that the CB-1 will just fade away and be, undeservedly, forgotten in an era of HP-horny bikers and the upcoming reign of electric motorcycles.

(Ive already ordered a poster of me on the CB-1 for future remembrance  Roll Eyes)

Was there ever a situation more deserving of a country and western song? I totally empathise 3NCORE. I met my first serious girlfriend (a million years ago) riding a gorgeous and very fast stock candy orange Honda CB250G5. It had beautiful chrome, and I'd highlighted the words 'AVON ROADRUNNER' in white tyre paint both front and back. Don't laugh. It's what race tyres looked like back in the day. It got her attention. She waved to me one day as I was leaving work at lunchtime. So the next day I stopped and spoke to her. She rode a Puch Maxi!

Don't give up. There's a girl out there with good taste. You're French, you know how it goes Wink


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ModerateFkr
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« Reply #16 on: August 18, 2017, 11:15:23 AM »

The little Cb has a funny place in motorcycle history. In the USA they were officially imported but under loved. Like the hawk they have a following but they won't ever match the hawk's cult status.

In the UK they were never officially imported but made it here at 10 years old by the container load from Japan as they started failing the sha'ken. That coincided perfectly with a new learner law of only being allowed 33hp. The Cb restricted well and was cheaper to insure than a hornet, so a large number of bikers my age (who turned 17 between 1999 and around 20005) had these as first bikes. I don't know though, I don't think bikes of this era will become classics like yesteryear.

17 in 1999? God, I'm a hundred years old!

These are great observations a_morti. What's needed is for the top classic bike mags to do articles. (most people are too lazy to figure out for themselves what's good) but only after we've bought all the CB-1s we can stash - like that guy you mentioned VH.

But you identified the theme yesterday a_morti: the fact that the CB-1 is the inspiration for all the others, and more than a match for the first Monster. That's a genuine claim to fame. We could indeed write the article - but not yet.

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Dash
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« Reply #17 on: August 19, 2017, 04:58:19 AM »

Funny this discussion popped up. When I was at Zandvoort, a man approached me (among some others) and started chatting away about the CB-1 (Its a shame the CB-1 is apperantly a scruffy biker magnet, rather than a chick magnet Grin ).

He told me to hang on to the CB, even if I were to get a new bike. He thought the CB-1 would become some sort of valuable collecter's item. He may be right. On  the other hand, it's also very possible that the CB-1 will just fade away and be, undeservedly, forgotten in an era of HP-horny bikers and the upcoming reign of electric motorcycles.

(Ive already ordered a poster of me on the CB-1 for future remembrance  Roll Eyes)

Was there ever a situation more deserving of a country and western song? I totally empathise 3NCORE. I met my first serious girlfriend (a million years ago) riding a gorgeous and very fast stock candy orange Honda CB250G5. It had beautiful chrome, and I'd highlighted the words 'AVON ROADRUNNER' in white tyre paint both front and back. Don't laugh. It's what race tyres looked like back in the day. It got her attention. She waved to me one day as I was leaving work at lunchtime. So the next day I stopped and spoke to her. She rode a Puch Maxi!

Don't give up. There's a girl out there with good taste. You're French, you know how it goes Wink




Heheh, good story.

Also, French? No need to get insulting Cheesy

I'm hardly French Shocked
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ModerateFkr
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« Reply #18 on: August 19, 2017, 09:19:41 AM »

I'm sorry Dash, I confused you with 3NCORE. Blame my age and Britishness Smiley

Am also very jealous of your track day exploits. Don't we all dream of emulating the greats on track? If you ever get a chance to ride at Donington, I can recommend it as a great bike circuit. I rode it, again a million years ago and on that same CB250G5. But that was before the track was completed. They were still fitting the edge blocks, so on the outside of the top bend was a trench!! I did quite a few circuits before the owner and his security guy turned up. Great fun. I miss those days.

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Drew m
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« Reply #19 on: August 19, 2017, 10:07:13 AM »

Ah,cb250g5,that brings back memories it was my first bike with L plates of course, but how gutless were they afair head wind had you dropping gears good style, what a difference when I had a go on my mates cb 400/4 (my next bike as it turned out).,but the g5 was a pleasant looking bike in its day I thought.
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ModerateFkr
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« Reply #20 on: August 19, 2017, 11:28:09 AM »

Ah,cb250g5,that brings back memories it was my first bike with L plates of course, but how gutless were they afair head wind had you dropping gears good style, what a difference when I had a go on my mates cb 400/4 (my next bike as it turned out).,but the g5 was a pleasant looking bike in its day I thought.


Indeed Drew. I passed my test on a CD175. My Dad didn't want me to get a much bigger bike. His cousin was killed on a bike. My aunt was on the back and was lucky to survive. She reminded him of the upset it caused the family.  He was unwell at the time, so I got a hot CB250G5 instead. Then I volunteered for the military to get my kicks!

My mate had a 400 Four too, the first anyone had seen. That was a revelation at the time.

I was incredibly lucky with that CB250G5. It had been very well run in. Then the previous owner put me in touch with his mate to give it a tune. I've completely forgotten the name of the company that did Honda tuning back then, but he fitted various bits, and ported the head. So my power range was totally different from standard.  The exhausts looked standard, but they were essentially gutted and minimally suppressed - just enough to create the back wave.

I've also just remembered that it had much stiffer Girling rear shocks, to sort out the Honda 'weave' and race wheel bearings. And eventually those wheels had to be rebuilt with Dunlop race alloy rims from the Norton/Triumph dealer that had 'Son of Sam' on display in their showroom for years.

Having said that, I don't think it improved my top end beyond 115mph. But acceleration was a match for the Yammy RD250s and Suzi 385s my other workmates had. Kawasakis were harder to keep up with, and the owners were a lot less friendly. Why was that I wonder?

Anyway, the reason I'm on disability now is partly due to the injuries I sustained when I was hit at 60mph side one one night. I was out of it for days, and when I woke up my bike had been scrapped. The corrupt cop took a bribe from the rich car driver and told them to scrap it! Bastard. The insurance company didn't complain. When I complained, the cop said he could have done me for riding whilst over the alcohol limit - which I wasn't.

Some years later the bike breaker went to prison for receiving stolen bikes. Of course the cop never got caught.

Just before I got my CB250G5 a mate of a mate got killed on one. He took a corner at high speed on those 'plastic' Bridgestones Honda fitted, and swallow dived head first into a tree! That was why I fitted Roadrunners (not TT100s) - after taking the same corner several times on those notorious 'plastic' Bridgestones, just to see how dangerous it really was. It eventually scared me. Thank goodness Bridgestone got their act together. Now they make some of the best road tyres.

We did crazy things back then. Death was an illusion in a far away country. We chased it like addicts. Now, on bad days, I walk my memories with a cane...!

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Drew m
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« Reply #21 on: August 19, 2017, 11:50:08 AM »

Yep, I had 2 or 3 spills my self which were bad enough but could have been alot worse, didn't stop me getting back on though, I think back then danger was an adrenaline rush till you got a bit older and some sense kicked in, unfortunately some guys didn't get the chance to get older. The yam rd250 was another bike I was familiar with as a mate had one, wasn't that far behind my 400/4, difference was more noticeable when carrying pillion, but what about the smoke these rd's pumped out when giving it welly and it lingered for ages.
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ModerateFkr
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« Reply #22 on: August 19, 2017, 12:49:41 PM »

Yep, I had 2 or 3 spills my self which were bad enough but could have been alot worse, didn't stop me getting back on though, I think back then danger was an adrenaline rush till you got a bit older and some sense kicked in, unfortunately some guys didn't get the chance to get older. The yam rd250 was another bike I was familiar with as a mate had one, wasn't that far behind my 400/4, difference was more noticeable when carrying pillion, but what about the smoke these rd's pumped out when giving it welly and it lingered for ages.

That's one good reason why I prefer four strokes Drew. Two stroke multis are odd things. Almost primitive. I've never warmed to them. Another mate raced Yamahas. Those 1980s watercooled little rockets. I forget the model. He had three of them for each class, and wanted me to manage him. I got him some sponsorship fairly easily, but it's hard work with little reward running a semi pro non factory team. Everyone goes into racing for the fun of it.

Having said that, I do like the quack quack sound of a Bultaco trials single. Am looking forward to the moment when I get mine restored and running again. They will be used to finance other projects.
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VintageHunter
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« Reply #23 on: August 19, 2017, 01:49:06 PM »

ahh...another 4-stroker lover.
I find the Vs (which some I love) are bit....umm...not sure how to describe it.
They are either "ALL ON" or "ALL OFF" and there's no in between.
When my Honda GT650 Hawk was tuned properly, man did that thing scream....and it was fun....for a little while.
But then when I got the VFR800....(V4) it was like the Hawk just more of it and I started noticing that all V-anything are either "ON" or "OFF" due to that low end torque and low RPMs.

I had an RZ350 as well..........fun bike when you get the feel of that 6K or so powerband, wheelies are a natural thing for that rocket.


The in-line 4s (now just my opinion and you can agree to disagree and that's fine-no need to get anyones panties bunched up)....the inline 4s seem to allow the rider some semblence of throttle adjustment. What I mean by that is...that it gives the pilot a few miliseconds to allow his brain to adjust to the acceleration of the engine, whereas the Vs are "blrrrrrPPPP....FULL ON!".....or........"brrrrrr.....I'm putting around at 0.5MPH".....but again just me and I know others will yell "blasphemus" so.....that's what I feel on these contraptions.

But hey, whatever floats yer boat eh.

enjoy the two wheels, don't kill yerselves and have fun.

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Dash
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« Reply #24 on: August 20, 2017, 05:57:27 AM »

All engine types have their own charm. Thats probably why I switch bikes so often. Shocked

First bikes were 600 inline 4's. I didnt rev them hard and thus thought they were boring. I didnt know jack **** about bikes back then though. I was just another dumb kid who wanted a 'racing bike'. So my first bike was a GPX 600 R which sounded sooooo good but rode sooooo bad Tongue. Then I got an FZR 600 which spend more time being broken than working properly.

Loving the low revs, I switched to twins. first a V twin (Hawk) then a parallel twin which was supposed to ride like a v twin due to some crankshaft modification magic blah blah but didn't... (TRX 850, great bike though)

Then I got into big singles. I -love- singles. Like, they make me wet myself. Almost literally. So I got a KTM Duke 2. Bad **** crazy bike. But KTM... so it broke down and killed itself due to an exploding tumbler. I got an KTM 950 SM after that. More mechanical misery so traded it for a mate's Monster 620.

The MOnster left me inumpressed so I went back to singles: an XTX 660. Great bike to hoon around on and I loved it. But started to shed bits and pieces due to heavy vibrations (gee, a 660 single that vibrates, you dont say?) so, thinking back to what had happened to the Duke 2, I got rid of it before it would fall apart entirely.

Someone I know from a Dutch bike forum offered to sell her CB-1 at the time. In the Netherlands, 4-in-lines above 600 cc are pretty much useless, apart from track use. So I wanted a 400, no more. And here we are. Grin

Next bike on the list is a Street Triple. Then Ill also have ridden a 3 cylinder bike Roll Eyes Or a MuZ Skorpion Sport. Also a truly -brilliant- bike.
Don't want to sell the CB though and I dont have room for 2 bikes.
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Drew m
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« Reply #25 on: August 20, 2017, 06:34:56 AM »

Big single cylinder bikes always make me think of these single cylinder road tar whackers that bounce along the road for some reason.
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Dash
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« Reply #26 on: August 20, 2017, 09:34:39 AM »

Big single cylinder bikes always make me think of these single cylinder road tar whackers that bounce along the road for some reason.

 Grin
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ModerateFkr
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« Reply #27 on: August 20, 2017, 11:27:46 AM »

Dash bro, you got ME excited when you mentioned the Dutch girl on a CB-1. So I'm going to say it before VintageHunter does: Pics or it didn't happen!!! Wink

Nice history. And some very interesting experiences. Thank you for sharing. Now go find the previous owner of your little racer Wink


All engine types have their own charm. Thats probably why I switch bikes so often. Shocked

First bikes were 600 inline 4's. I didnt rev them hard and thus thought they were boring. I didnt know jack **** about bikes back then though. I was just another dumb kid who wanted a 'racing bike'. So my first bike was a GPX 600 R which sounded sooooo good but rode sooooo bad Tongue. Then I got an FZR 600 which spend more time being broken than working properly.

Loving the low revs, I switched to twins. first a V twin (Hawk) then a parallel twin which was supposed to ride like a v twin due to some crankshaft modification magic blah blah but didn't... (TRX 850, great bike though)

Then I got into big singles. I -love- singles. Like, they make me wet myself. Almost literally. So I got a KTM Duke 2. Bad **** crazy bike. But KTM... so it broke down and killed itself due to an exploding tumbler. I got an KTM 950 SM after that. More mechanical misery so traded it for a mate's Monster 620.

The MOnster left me inumpressed so I went back to singles: an XTX 660. Great bike to hoon around on and I loved it. But started to shed bits and pieces due to heavy vibrations (gee, a 660 single that vibrates, you dont say?) so, thinking back to what had happened to the Duke 2, I got rid of it before it would fall apart entirely.

Someone I know from a Dutch bike forum offered to sell her CB-1 at the time. In the Netherlands, 4-in-lines above 600 cc are pretty much useless, apart from track use. So I wanted a 400, no more. And here we are. Grin

Next bike on the list is a Street Triple. Then Ill also have ridden a 3 cylinder bike Roll Eyes Or a MuZ Skorpion Sport. Also a truly -brilliant- bike.
Don't want to sell the CB though and I dont have room for 2 bikes.
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VintageHunter
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« Reply #28 on: August 20, 2017, 12:39:23 PM »

+1
Agreed.
Dash bro, you got ME excited when you mentioned the Dutch girl on a CB-1. So I'm going to say it before VintageHunter does: Pics or it didn't happen!!! Wink

Nice history. And some very interesting experiences. Thank you for sharing. Now go find the previous owner of your little racer Wink


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Dash
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« Reply #29 on: August 21, 2017, 04:02:59 AM »

No need to find her. She's still on the forum, I have her adress and phone number from when I was buying CeeBee off her. But she's already spoken for and not my type really. And Ill refrain from posting her picture for you drooling lot to look at  Grin Grin Grin
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