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Author Topic: Just received my CB-1, I'm in love  (Read 1649 times)
Spurlock
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« on: December 30, 2017, 12:08:42 PM »

My '89 CB-1 was delivered the other evening and after checking it over a bit I took it out for a nice twisty road ride. I now understand the enthusiasm others have for this amazing little bike. I was expecting the turbine-like smoothness as I once owned a CB350 four and have worked on many 1970s CB400Fs. And I was expecting the high rpm power, but expecting and experiencing it are two different things. What I was not expecting is the very wide useable power band. Riding familiar twisty roads I started out constantly downshifting for turns, then shifting back up on the straights. But I soon figured out that the bike is perfectly happy to just stay in 6th gear much of the time, even when lightly rolling on throttle from 25 mph. At times it feels like riding with an automatic transmission: decelerate coming into town, roll through at 30 mph, then roll on a bit of throttle as the speed limit goes to 40, then 55, all the while staying in 6th gear. Totally user friendly but with thrilling high rpm power at the ready when needed.

Anyway, enough blabbing, here are a few pictures from my first ride.


















-Bill
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1975 Honda CB125S2, 1989 Honda NX250, 1989 Honda GB500, 1989 Honda CB-1
a_morti
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« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2017, 12:24:24 PM »

Happy new bike day!
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Cam Drive Gear Train Smiley
See Bee-Won
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« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2017, 03:12:21 PM »

Beautiful bike and scenery. Snow and bitter cold here. Cry  The CB-1 does have nice wide powerband for a .4 liter bike. Doesn't hurt that the stock gearing is like a farm tractor.  Cheesy
« Last Edit: December 31, 2017, 03:15:35 PM by See Bee-Won » Logged
Spurlock
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« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2017, 03:52:31 PM »

Beautiful bike and scenery. Snow and bitter cold here. Cry  The CB-1 does have nice wide powerband for a .4 liter bike. Doesn't hurt that the stock gearing is like a farm tractor.  Cheesy

Yeah, it really does seem to be geared too low for my taste. Of course the contrast to my GB500 single makes it seem even more "revvy." I'm a light rider and will always be riding solo so I've ordered the 37T sprocket to try out. Besides lowering the revs I would like a bit more space between the gears.

-Bill
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1975 Honda CB125S2, 1989 Honda NX250, 1989 Honda GB500, 1989 Honda CB-1
Dash
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« Reply #4 on: January 01, 2018, 06:30:07 AM »

Nice looking CB ya got there. Still too cold and all the reaods are salty here. Good to see CB's elsewhere are still being ridden this time of year. Grin
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Sugs
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« Reply #5 on: January 01, 2018, 03:10:46 PM »

Congrats on your new to you ride!  Love the pictures of your CB-1 in its native habitat, and welcome to the site!
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Spurlock
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« Reply #6 on: January 01, 2018, 08:47:37 PM »

Congrats on your new to you ride!  Love the pictures of your CB-1 in its native habitat, and welcome to the site!

Thank you Sugs and others for the kind comments, I've mined this forum for lots of good info and look forward to more learning and sharing in the future. The CB-1 is such a sweet bike!

-Bill
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1975 Honda CB125S2, 1989 Honda NX250, 1989 Honda GB500, 1989 Honda CB-1
Spurlock
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« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2018, 11:31:11 AM »

After fixing the gas cap and upgrading to a Blackbird shock I've done some cosmetic upgrades and now have the bike just about where I want it. There was some corrosion and peeling paint on the leading edges of the forks and clutch cover and a few rust spots and scratches on the swing arm, so I stripped off the old paint, glass bead blasted, and repainted.

Before:






Stripping and blasting - I like how bead blasting leaves a perfect fine texture for good paint adhesion:









It was fun to get my first peek inside the engine.



The Dupli-Color BFM0225 Medium Charcoal Metallic turned out to be a perfect match to the original color. I followed up with two coats of SprayMax 2K gloss clear coat for fuel resistance and toughness. This catalyzed clear leaves a much higher gloss than the original paint, but I like a little tasteful bling. I buffed all fasteners and clear coated most of them as well. The after:









I went ahead and replaced the chain and swapped to a 37T rear sprocket as well.



I like shiny clean hardware because.....bling!



I have Oxford heated grips on two other bikes and really like them, so......



The front dampening felt too stiff, so while I had the forks apart I used a viscosity cup to measure the current oil. It took 34 seconds to empty which is quite high compared to typical fork oils. I changed to synthetic ATF which measured 21 seconds. The front feels much more compliant now while still having good dampening.



So for now the bike is basically where I want it except for one dent in the tank. It's not bad enough to warrant repainting so I might check with paintless dent repair shops and see if anything can be done. Unfortunately due to the inside shape of the tank the dent is not accessible from inside. Anyone have experience with similar dents?



It's been great fun getting to know the ins and outs of the bike by working on it, but more so by riding favorite local twisty roads!






-Bill
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spacetiger
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« Reply #8 on: January 16, 2018, 12:08:51 PM »

She looks awesome!
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See Bee-Won
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« Reply #9 on: January 21, 2018, 10:23:11 AM »

How do you like the higher gearing? Nice having a little more space between the gears and a bit of an overdrive, isn't is?

Is that still the stock muffler? I replaced mine with a Kerker slip-on soon after I brought her home in 1990. I run it with no packing now and as long as you don't rev it too high around town it is still low tone and tolerable. On the back roads winding her up into the meat of the powerband and hearing that exotic Ferrari sounding shriek overpower the wind noise is soooo sweet. Jekyll and Hyde.  Grin
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Spurlock
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« Reply #10 on: January 21, 2018, 11:30:20 AM »

How do you like the higher gearing? Nice having a little more space between the gears and a bit of an overdrive, isn't is?

Yes, I really like it geared higher. For my riding style and light weight I could even go a bit higher yet. Fourth-fifth-sixth are still quite close together, and sixth is still usable for anything over 25-30 mph. And that's even with an oversized rear tire. My speedo read 1 mph high with stock gearing, and now reads ~8% low. Just wish there was an easy way to adapt a tiny gearbox to the cable to correct it. Hmmm, there's a project there.

Is that still the stock muffler? I replaced mine with a Kerker slip-on soon after I brought her home in 1990. I run it with no packing now and as long as you don't rev it too high around town it is still low tone and tolerable. On the back roads winding her up into the meat of the powerband and hearing that exotic Ferrari sounding shriek overpower the wind noise is soooo sweet. Jekyll and Hyde.  Grin

Yep, stock muffler. I can imagine how wonderful that Kerker sounds when wound out! But I much prefer quiet exhausts both for my own comfort and to avoid annoying the public. Living on a scenic back road popular with motorcyclists, I know how pissed off I get when my peaceful surroundings are invaded by screaming sport bikes, and moreso obnoxious roaring Harleys! To each his own.

-Bill
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Paulbwatertownct
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« Reply #11 on: January 22, 2018, 01:51:55 AM »

Bill,
Beautiful bike, wow, it looks brand new.

Regarding the dent in the tank.  Iíve seen a few you tube videos where people have popped dents out with a hair dryer and a can of compressed air. The heat/freeze causes the dent to pop. Not sure if it would work on yours but worth a try and no risk.

Also, I see you have Hawk GT bars on your bike. Did you need longer throttle cables?

Lastly, I too have a 37 rear sprocket, but I also went up to a 16 tooth front. The gearing is now where I want it but as you stated, the speedo is off.

Here is the sprocket info:
16 tooth front JT sprocket
JTF297.16 
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In the garage now: 03 Aprilia RST, 01 Aprilia Falco, 89 NT650, 89 CB-1, 90 NSR250R-SP, 91 CBR600F2, 79 CX500B
Dash
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« Reply #12 on: January 22, 2018, 03:15:26 AM »

How do you like the higher gearing? Nice having a little more space between the gears and a bit of an overdrive, isn't is?

Yes, I really like it geared higher. For my riding style and light weight I could even go a bit higher yet. Fourth-fifth-sixth are still quite close together, and sixth is still usable for anything over 25-30 mph. And that's even with an oversized rear tire. My speedo read 1 mph high with stock gearing, and now reads ~8% low. Just wish there was an easy way to adapt a tiny gearbox to the cable to correct it. Hmmm, there's a project there.

Is that still the stock muffler? I replaced mine with a Kerker slip-on soon after I brought her home in 1990. I run it with no packing now and as long as you don't rev it too high around town it is still low tone and tolerable. On the back roads winding her up into the meat of the powerband and hearing that exotic Ferrari sounding shriek overpower the wind noise is soooo sweet. Jekyll and Hyde.  Grin

Yep, stock muffler. I can imagine how wonderful that Kerker sounds when wound out! But I much prefer quiet exhausts both for my own comfort and to avoid annoying the public. Living on a scenic back road popular with motorcyclists, I know how pissed off I get when my peaceful surroundings are invaded by screaming sport bikes, and moreso obnoxious roaring Harleys! To each his own.

-Bill

So what's the actual effect of changing the sprocket? Do you have better acceleration or a higher top speed?
Been thinking about tinkering with the sprocket size as well but Im not too sure what to go for and what to expect.
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a_morti
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« Reply #13 on: January 22, 2018, 05:04:21 AM »

How do you like the higher gearing? Nice having a little more space between the gears and a bit of an overdrive, isn't is?

Yes, I really like it geared higher. For my riding style and light weight I could even go a bit higher yet. Fourth-fifth-sixth are still quite close together, and sixth is still usable for anything over 25-30 mph. And that's even with an oversized rear tire. My speedo read 1 mph high with stock gearing, and now reads ~8% low. Just wish there was an easy way to adapt a tiny gearbox to the cable to correct it. Hmmm, there's a project there.

Is that still the stock muffler? I replaced mine with a Kerker slip-on soon after I brought her home in 1990. I run it with no packing now and as long as you don't rev it too high around town it is still low tone and tolerable. On the back roads winding her up into the meat of the powerband and hearing that exotic Ferrari sounding shriek overpower the wind noise is soooo sweet. Jekyll and Hyde.  Grin

Yep, stock muffler. I can imagine how wonderful that Kerker sounds when wound out! But I much prefer quiet exhausts both for my own comfort and to avoid annoying the public. Living on a scenic back road popular with motorcyclists, I know how pissed off I get when my peaceful surroundings are invaded by screaming sport bikes, and moreso obnoxious roaring Harleys! To each his own.

-Bill

So what's the actual effect of changing the sprocket? Do you have better acceleration or a higher top speed?
Been thinking about tinkering with the sprocket size as well but Im not too sure what to go for and what to expect.
My opinion is 15/41 isn't far off from ideal, unless you're doing mostly highway miles. Drop to 15/37 to reduce revs but you will get a noticeable reduction in acceleration off the line.

Mine has 15/39 with a 160 tyre on cbr4 wheel. Works fine and Speedo is within a percentage point or two of exact. Might prefer a bigger sprocket but they don't exist off the shelf for nc29 wheel.
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Spurlock
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« Reply #14 on: January 22, 2018, 11:25:41 AM »

....Also, I see you have Hawk GT bars on your bike. Did you need longer throttle cables?....

Thanks Paul, The hawk bars were on the bike when I bought it. I received a box of spare parts that has throttle, choke, and clutch cables so I assume they are originals and longer ones were needed, but I have not checked them for sure.

So what's the actual effect of changing the sprocket? Do you have better acceleration or a higher top speed?
Been thinking about tinkering with the sprocket size as well but Im not too sure what to go for and what to expect.

I would say the stock gearing is about perfect for 1/4 mile drag races, but for my taste is needlessly low for normal street use. Changing the rear from 41T to 37T lowers rpm 9% for a given bike speed. Now instead of turning 7,300 rpm at 65 mph it turns about 6,500 rpm, still has plenty of power, a bit less vibration, and less engine noise and wear. (This is with a 140/80 rear tire instead of stock 140/70. The oversized rear tire makes the gearing slightly higher than stock by itself.) Starting from a stop in first gear is no problem and does not require any more clutch slipping than stock.

Besides lowering rpm, a higher overall gear ratio increases the spacing between gears which I really like. With stock gearing the jumps between gears, especially 4th to 5th to 6th, felt so small I often wondered if I had missed a shift and was still in the same gear. Now the steps are more noticeable and don't feel so much like needless busy work for my left foot. I doubt top speed is much different (have not tested) since wind resistance becomes a limiting factor without a fairing.

Again, the higher gearing is just my preference as a 150# rider with no passenger, riding a spirited but sensible pace in hilly twisty areas. YMMV.

-Bill

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1975 Honda CB125S2, 1989 Honda NX250, 1989 Honda GB500, 1989 Honda CB-1
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