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Author Topic: So, these 400 cc bikes  (Read 1036 times)
Dash
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« on: March 17, 2018, 07:22:52 AM »

Having owned the CB1 for almost a year now, I am throrougly convinced that 400cc bikes are my cup of tea. Then I started to wonder. What to do when the unmentionable happens, and my CB dies. What alternatives are there? There is a new generation of 300cc bikes. I find those to be a bit too low on power (yes, I said it) and they don't have the... bravado the CB1's 4 in line has. Kawasaki just let slip they re gonna produce a 400cc Ninja. But its a parallell twin... Id love to own a Z400 but even if that would ever see the light of day, it too, would be a parallel twin and not a screaming 4-in-line. So, apart from the obvious one (FZR 400, CBR 400, GSXR 400, ZXR 400, RGF 400, VFR 400R) what other 400 cc in line 4 are out there that could replace the CB1?

Or any other bikes that have a CB-1-eque feel to it? (Ive already owned a Hawk)

Thoughts?
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hutchence
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« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2018, 01:03:58 PM »

I do not see anything comparable, and that's why I have two ;-)
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Sugs
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« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2018, 01:27:24 PM »

Honda CB400SF "Super Four" would be a great option if they imported them to the States.  Now has fuel injection but not the gear driven cams.

I like the KTM Duke 390 but its a single(albeit the nicest sounding single I've ever heard) and is a tiny machine, just too small for me being 6'1".

Really the closest thing I've ever found is the Yamaha FZ-07.  As light or lighter than the CB-1, more power and torque(of course, much bigger motor), and the "Big Bang" crank.  Not the sounds of the CB-1 of course, but a very unique sounding bike that I could get used to. 
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1979 Honda GL1000 Goldwing - 1990 Honda CB1
a_morti
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« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2018, 04:50:23 PM »

As above, the cb400sf is still being made. Same engine with fuel injection and vtec (yo). Plus twin disc with calipers like a 00-03 fireblade as standard. I'm not sure you could bring one to Europe or the states though, as it won't meet the contemporary emissions standards. I'm not quite so hot on the twin shock look, but I'd ride one in a pinch Wink

The mt07 looks interesting but they really don't do well at living near the seaside, I have seen some locally just a year or two old looking like crap with rusty fasteners and forks already.

The cb500x could've been a contender, but why so heavy? Still, I think it's the closest to a modern CB-1 that exists. A naked version of a middle weight sports bike with a big single disc and bouncy suspension  Grin similar overall power, but exponentially better on fuel, as befits the two missing cylinders and 25 years of development in internal combustion technology.

I may have the same problem some day... Wonder how I'll solve it?? Probably with something else from the 80s or 90s.
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Dash
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« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2018, 07:38:53 AM »

Having owned 2 KTMS, I can say that KTM makes barking mad bikes. But boy, do they fall apart fast. At least, mine did. So Im not bothering with another KTM. (otherwise the Duke 390 would have been on my radar)

The CB 400 SF is not really my cup of tea easthetics wise. Plus it's hard / impossible to find in mainland Europe.

CB500X... Not really something Id want to ride.

Word has it the ZXR 400 is also a mental bike. take the fairing off, and you get a CB-1 ish bike with superior suspension and a bit more top end. Word has it that the midrange is awful, though.

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filterMan
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« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2018, 06:02:36 AM »

I've had the same thoughts and I've been looking around lately. It's good to see smaller capacity bikes on the rise again. The BMW G310R gets a good review although I'm not sure how I would cope with a 34bhp single although one of my favorite bikes was a 125cc single. I've not ridden one though but I hear they are a hoot to ride.
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Dash
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« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2018, 07:23:34 AM »

There s some SZR 660's for sale close to home. Bit of an obscure bike but they re quite a hoot to ride word has it. XT 660 engine slotted in a TZR 250 frame with brembo brakes. Roll Eyes
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a_morti
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« Reply #7 on: March 21, 2018, 12:19:08 PM »

I had a 650gs single. Not the same as that bike, put it was enough to inform me I don't like big single cylinder bikes. Definitely try before you buy!
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Spurlock
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« Reply #8 on: March 21, 2018, 08:15:20 PM »

I had a 650gs single. Not the same as that bike, put it was enough to inform me I don't like big single cylinder bikes. Definitely try before you buy!

Yeah, but big singles have their own unique personality. Variety is the spice of life, I say we need both singles and multis!  Grin





-Bill
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1975 Honda CB125S2, 1989 Honda NX250, 1989 Honda GB500, 1989 Honda CB-1
a_morti
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« Reply #9 on: March 21, 2018, 08:53:56 PM »

That is a lovely looking bike. Reckon I'd like it better with a twin though.
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Efreeman55
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« Reply #10 on: March 21, 2018, 09:34:58 PM »

I also have a 1989 GB500 (now a 601cc!) and it's a great companion to the CB1.  Essentially the same size and weight, nearly identical riding position but a unique riding experience.  Virtually no vibration due to the balance shaft and amazing torque and power (especially with the upgrades).  When I ride my CB1 it seems like the bike is going much faster than it really is whereas the GB is just the opposite.  It never seems stressed and pulls like a freight train.  I really enjoy both, although my bad knee is making me think these close-coupled bikes might be better off in someone else's stable since it's getting more painful to ride them these days.

Eric

L1000314 by Eric Freeman, on Flickr
« Last Edit: March 21, 2018, 11:02:05 PM by Efreeman55 » Logged
Dash
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« Reply #11 on: March 22, 2018, 04:44:57 AM »

I had a 650gs single. Not the same as that bike, put it was enough to inform me I don't like big single cylinder bikes. Definitely try before you buy!

Yeah, but big singles have their own unique personality. Variety is the spice of life, I say we need both singles and multis!  Grin





-Bill

Very true. Lovely bike btw.

Each configuration has its own charms. Some you can get along with, other you can't. If only I had space for 2 motorcycles... Sad
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Pod70
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« Reply #12 on: March 22, 2018, 09:16:18 AM »

Aaron, Not all singles are created equal - I've owned a few XBR500's in the past and would happily buy another if I had the space.
For a single, they are remarkably smooth but I have been on some shonky old singles which felt like a pneumatic hammer.
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ptlcb1
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« Reply #13 on: March 22, 2018, 11:11:49 AM »

What you do is find and buy another CB -1👍👍
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Spurlock
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« Reply #14 on: March 22, 2018, 11:37:28 AM »

Each configuration has its own charms. Some you can get along with, other you can't. If only I had space for 2 motorcycles... Sad

No, two is not enough, you also need a dual sport!




Oh, and while you're at it, a nice little tiddler!



-Bill
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1975 Honda CB125S2, 1989 Honda NX250, 1989 Honda GB500, 1989 Honda CB-1
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