Also Check Out
ATVFlorida.com
PinballShark.com

© 2014
HondaCB1.org Message Forums
August 20, 2018, 08:28:35 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Welcome to HondaCB1.org! Please register in the Forum to post messages or view attached photos.
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Introduction new member 12 year garaged gift  (Read 813 times)
Normalcb1
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3


View Profile
« on: April 29, 2018, 09:26:24 PM »

Howdy!

I'm a New CB1 owner!

I inherited the bike from a friend who had the bike in storage the last 12 years. Her and I put a stage 2 jet and a pipe on in back in the day, she moved to California and I moved to New York. After all the years we meet back up in St.Louis but I haven't ridden in nearly 20 years having stepped away from corner marshaling duties with WERA to raise a family and reduce health risks by putting up my lid until my babies had grown. Well as it happens to work out my friend was moving to Australia and wanted the old bike to go to a loving home, and my youngest daughter turns 18 next month allowing me the emotional freedom to again get back on 2 wheels, and on a bike I help MOD over 20 years ago no less!

I last rode a 600 bandit about 2 decades ago, but still have my M endorsement of course!

I'm looking forward to reading all of the information already available here as I begin the un mothballing of this amazing bike.

My 1st steps are reading the manual over so I can get to the spark plugs and get some oil into the cylinder heads to soak a few weeks before starting on fluids. I was told the oil was changed, the gas was drained, but no other storage preparation was done to her before the move from California back to the midwest. Other than a broken front turn signal, and a dent in the gas tank the bike survived its time in her sisters garage under a cover unscathed.


I expect to start this summer once I get the bike shipped back to Normal Illinois and hopefully will be able to do some work every week as finances allow. I have no clue how big a project I've just bitten off, but I promised the previous owner a good home, and to me that means a fully and meticulously maintained motorcycle from the skins to the grips, as good as she ever was (plus a dent in the gas tank, that just character too good to pass up).


If there are any recommendations on where do I start my research on restoration, or a good thread for someone like me to start on, Please share your thoughts. I'm not jumping in until I have a clear plan, and proper funds for the resurrection.

NormalCB1
Logged
Spurlock
Full Member
***
Online Online

Location: N. California

Posts: 108


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: April 29, 2018, 11:05:49 PM »

Greetings NormalCB1,

Sounds like you have a nice project there. How many miles are on it, and was it running fine when parked? Assuming it was running fine before, I would top up crankcase oil level, then pull the tank and air filter element and spray some Sta-Bil Fogging Oil into each carb throat, then crank the engine with kill switch off to lubricate the cylinders. Then add a small amount of gas to the tank, open petcock to "reserve" position and crank the engine for ten seconds at a time, again with kill switch off. That will activate the fuel pump to fill the float bowls. Then fit a piece of tubing to each float bowl drain in turn, opening its drain screw to flush out any contaminants in the petcock, fuel lines and float valves. Then close all drains, crank in short bursts again to refill float bowls, turn on kill switch and see what happens. All the previous cranking should have brought oil to the top end, cam and valves etc. so when it fires up you are in good shape. Hopefully there is some service history on the bike, but if not once it is running go ahead and test ride enough to check out performance. Then knowing what you have, go ahead and flush/change coolant, engine oil, fork oil, brake fluids, replace tires, check chain & sprockets, etc. Let us know how it goes, and good luck!

-Bill
« Last Edit: April 29, 2018, 11:07:37 PM by Spurlock » Logged

1975 Honda CB125S2, 1989 Honda NX250, 1989 Honda GB500, 1989 Honda CB-1
Sugs
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Location: San Diego, CA

Posts: 164



View Profile
« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2018, 02:12:24 AM »

Great story and welcome to the site!  Here's to hoping she wakes easily for you.
Logged

1979 Honda GL1000 Goldwing - 1990 Honda CB1
RVFRick
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 23



View Profile
« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2018, 04:12:05 AM »

Welcome back to motorcycling! Your story echos mine. I was away from bike 18 years and got lured back one year ago through a project bike (RVF400 which is still not running  Roll Eyes) I picked up a CB-1 in the meantime and it's a fantastic bike.
Logged

You meet the nicest people on a Honda.
RVF400, CB-1, C70, C70, C70
RVFRick
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 23



View Profile
« Reply #4 on: May 02, 2018, 04:22:07 AM »

pull the tank and air filter element and spray some Sta-Bil Fogging Oil into each carb throat
-Bill

Hi Bill, great advice as always.

Should he clean out the fuel path to the carbs first lest debris makes it way to the finicky carbs. Would be wise to do all to avoid a carb overhaul.

Also, please educate us the purpose of spraying "Sta-Bil Fogging Oil into each carb throat" does. Can't he just leave the tank on and go straight to the fuel priming steps?

I suggest inspecting the interior of the tank before doing anything. Could offer up some hints as to the condition of unobservable areas. My 2 cents  Wink.
Logged

You meet the nicest people on a Honda.
RVF400, CB-1, C70, C70, C70
Spurlock
Full Member
***
Online Online

Location: N. California

Posts: 108


View Profile
« Reply #5 on: May 02, 2018, 10:12:06 AM »

pull the tank and air filter element and spray some Sta-Bil Fogging Oil into each carb throat
-Bill

Hi Bill, great advice as always.

Should he clean out the fuel path to the carbs first lest debris makes it way to the finicky carbs. Would be wise to do all to avoid a carb overhaul.

Also, please educate us the purpose of spraying "Sta-Bil Fogging Oil into each carb throat" does. Can't he just leave the tank on and go straight to the fuel priming steps?

I suggest inspecting the interior of the tank before doing anything. Could offer up some hints as to the condition of unobservable areas. My 2 cents  Wink.

Agree it never hurts to flush each part of the fuel path to minimize sending crud downstream to the carbs. And the fuel filter should be replaced or at least removed and flushed since some old gas was most likely trapped in it. But besides the petcock filter screen there is a fine mesh screen on each float valve, so small bits of crud will not make it into the carbs.

The problem with carbs that share a common fuel inlet plumbing like these is that even if the float bowl drains were opened and emptied before storage, quite a bit of fuel stays trapped in the passageways between gas line and float valves. You find that out the first time you drain the float bowls, pull the carbs and turn them over on the workbench! That's why I'd suggest opening the float bowl drains and running gas through a couple of times, so at least dissolved old fuel might be rinsed out of the system.

As for the fogging oil, I was just suggesting that as an easier way to get oil into the cylinders rather than pulling the plugs. Once he confirms it will run then plugs can be replaced during a valve check since they would need to be removed for that anyway. And you're right, inspecting the tank (what little can be seen of its insides) would be worthwhile. Pulling the petcock and rinsing the tank a couple times with a bit of gas would be a minimum first step.

-Bill
Logged

1975 Honda CB125S2, 1989 Honda NX250, 1989 Honda GB500, 1989 Honda CB-1
Normalcb1
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: May 05, 2018, 08:30:03 PM »

She has 16k on the clock now. I appreciate the tips! I was thinking a squirt of Marvel oil in each cylinder and let it sit a couple weeks, should I fog it too?? a new fuel filter and rinse the tank. I haven't even peeked at the tank yet my finances are still committed to my sons car and my daily driver, I owe my mechanic 580 for my whip and still have to take my sons car in for about 1800 in repairs next. the last year has been unforgiving! Ill try and get some photos hosted soon. My next step is to get her moved from Chesterfield Mo to Normal Ill so I can start repairs!

Normal
Logged
Spurlock
Full Member
***
Online Online

Location: N. California

Posts: 108


View Profile
« Reply #7 on: May 05, 2018, 09:09:51 PM »

She has 16k on the clock now. I appreciate the tips! I was thinking a squirt of Marvel oil in each cylinder and let it sit a couple weeks, should I fog it too?? a new fuel filter and rinse the tank. I haven't even peeked at the tank yet my finances are still committed to my sons car and my daily driver, I owe my mechanic 580 for my whip and still have to take my sons car in for about 1800 in repairs next. the last year has been unforgiving! Ill try and get some photos hosted soon. My next step is to get her moved from Chesterfield Mo to Normal Ill so I can start repairs!

Normal

Sounds like you have a lot on your plate! There should be no need for any soaking time of oil in cylinders unless the engine were seized or stored outdoors with exhaust or air box removed where moisture could get into the cylinders. Otherwise things should be pristine inside. Marvel Mystery Oil is better called "snake oil", nothing marvelous or mysterious about it. It is logical to want to add a bit of fresh lubrication to the top end before cranking though. It's probably not necessary but certainly can't hurt. I suggest fogging oil sprayed into the carb throats while cranking because it is atomized and will lubricate the valve stems as well as cylinders. If you wanted to be super conscientious you could pull the valve cover and apply MoS2 assembly lube to the cam lobes and fog the cylinders through the plug holes while you have them out. Personally I wouldn't bother since plenty of oil will be retained in the cyl head unless thew bike was turned upside-down.

-Bill
Logged

1975 Honda CB125S2, 1989 Honda NX250, 1989 Honda GB500, 1989 Honda CB-1
See Bee-Won
Jr. Member
**
Online Online

Posts: 42


View Profile
« Reply #8 on: May 06, 2018, 02:03:53 PM »

Looks like you already got some good advice on sorting out the engine. Once you get it running well: Don't go too far or too fast on those old tires even if they still hold air. That rubber is hockey puck hard now and not safe for leaning into a corner or panic stopping. Not to mention you will feel every little pebble you ride over. New sport tires ride sooooo nice.

Open the bleeder on the caliper and cap on the reservoir and pump out the old fluid with the pedal/lever. Before the reservoir goes dry (don't let it suck air!) fill with new fluid and pump until the new stuff is coming out the bleeder. (If it looks real nasty or has debris in the reservoir turkey baste out as much as you can instead of pushing it through)

 Check the chain for slack and tight links. The factory grease in the o-ring chain internal links gets old and hard with age with no practical way of relubing. I would expect the chain to wear out fast and start kinking once you start putting on some miles so plan on a new one. I prefer non o-ring chains myself but they are a little noisier and require periodic lubing but will last a very long time with care and rob less HP because there is no rubber o-ring friction.

Wouldn't hurt to change the coolant. Pull cap off. Drain bolt on the pump and two on the front of the cylinders. Refill with 50/50 and start up and let idle with cap off, keep adding more coolant until the system is full. Make sure overflow tank is filled to the line when cool (kind of hard to see when the plastic gets old and cloudy)
Logged
Normalcb1
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3


View Profile
« Reply #9 on: May 06, 2018, 07:19:37 PM »

I ordered a can of sta-bil fog oil  Grin

Thanks all for the input, I'm more hopeful than ever!

I'll stop by my old dealer Tuesday and price a fuel filter, battery and some riding gear. Ohh NEW RUBBER! I cant imagine how much tires have changed in 20 years!

Normal
Logged
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!